Debt Collector – CTXETG http://ctxetg.com/ Thu, 13 Jan 2022 22:04:48 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://ctxetg.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-150x150.png Debt Collector – CTXETG http://ctxetg.com/ 32 32 Navient settles predatory student loan claims for $1.85 billion https://ctxetg.com/navient-settles-predatory-student-loan-claims-for-1-85-billion/ Thu, 13 Jan 2022 20:48:12 +0000 https://ctxetg.com/navient-settles-predatory-student-loan-claims-for-1-85-billion/ January 13, 2022 12:24 By STEVE LeBLANC – Associated Press Job : January 13, 2022 12:24 Update: January 13, 2022 1:49 p.m. William Bretzger – member, The Wilmington News-Journal FILE – This April 2, 2014, file photo shows the headquarters of student debt collector Navient Corporation, in Wilmington, Delaware. Pennsylvania’s attorney general says top student […]]]>

BOSTON (AP) — Navient, a major student loan collection company, has agreed to forgive $1.7 billion in debt owed by more than 66,000 borrowers across the United States and pay more than $140 million in dollars of other penalties to address allegations of abusive lending practices.

The settlement with 39 state attorneys general was announced Thursday.

Navient “engaged in deceptive and abusive practices, targeted students it believed would struggle to repay their loans, and placed an unfair burden on people trying to improve their lives through education,” said Pennsylvania Attorney General Josh Shapiro. who helped lead the negotiations, said in a statement.

Among other things, he said, Navient tricked borrowers who were struggling to make payments into entering what are known as long-term forbearances, causing them to indebted even more.

Forbearance occurs when lenders allow borrowers to suspend or reduce payments for a limited time while they rebuild their finances. However, interest on the loan continues to accrue and may eventually result in an increase in the amount paid over the life of the loan.

Navient has denied acting unlawfully and has not admitted any wrongdoing under the settlement, which is subject to court approval.

“Navient is and has always been focused on helping student borrowers understand and select the right payment options to meet their needs,” Chief Legal Officer Mark Heleen said in a statement.

Along with canceling tens of thousands of loans, Navient will pay $142.5 million, most of which will go to about 350,000 borrowers who have been placed in long-term forbearances.

Additionally, Navient will need to do more to educate borrowers about their options and explain repayment plans.

Massachusetts Attorney General Maura Healey called the settlement “an important step toward solving our broken student loan repayment system.”

Borrowers whose loans are canceled will receive notice from Navient along with a refund of any payments made after mid-2021.

The settlement also includes Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, District of Columbia, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri and Nebraska. , Nevada, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Oregon, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Tennessee, Vermont, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia and Wisconsin.

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How to tell if a debt collector is legitimate or a scam – WSOC TV https://ctxetg.com/how-to-tell-if-a-debt-collector-is-legitimate-or-a-scam-wsoc-tv/ Tue, 11 Jan 2022 22:12:23 +0000 https://ctxetg.com/how-to-tell-if-a-debt-collector-is-legitimate-or-a-scam-wsoc-tv/ PAGELAND, SC – A woman in Pageland turned to Action 9 for help after receiving a letter from a debt collector, and she wasn’t sure if it was legit or a scam. Felicia Miller gave birth to her son in September 2020 at Atrium Health Union. She thought she had paid all of her medical […]]]>

PAGELAND, SC – A woman in Pageland turned to Action 9 for help after receiving a letter from a debt collector, and she wasn’t sure if it was legit or a scam.

Felicia Miller gave birth to her son in September 2020 at Atrium Health Union. She thought she had paid all of her medical bills until she received a notice from Medical Data Systems stating that she still owed the hospital over $ 1,800.

“I was just trying to find out if the money will go to a real bill or if it is a scam,” she told Action 9 investigator Jason Stoogenke. “To be on the safe side, I just wanted you all to investigate.”

Action 9 often receives complaints about debt collectors. Some are real businesses while others are con artists who try to extract money from people.

Here are some tips on whether it’s legitimate:

First, contact the vendor or company they say they owe instead of the debt collector in case the collector turns out to be a scammer trying to get personal information or money.

Ask the supplier for two things:

1) If you owe money.

2) If the supplier uses the collection agency who contacts you.

Through their investigation, Stoogenke and Miller discovered that Medical Data Systems, which also uses the name Medical Revenue Service, is a legitimate business that Atrium Health uses for debt collection. However, Miller found out that she did not owe the hospital any money.

According to Miller, after Action 9 intervened, someone from Atrium called her and told her that her account balance was zero.

“$ 1,800 is a big wad of money that I don’t just have to hand out,” she said.

According to the Federal Trade Commission, debt collectors generate more fraud reports than any other industry. Click here to see the list of debt collectors the FTC has banned.

(WATCH: New rules: Debt collectors can contact you via social media)

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Mayfield’s season ends on the sidelines, an operation awaits the Browns QB https://ctxetg.com/mayfields-season-ends-on-the-sidelines-an-operation-awaits-the-browns-qb/ Mon, 10 Jan 2022 00:31:16 +0000 https://ctxetg.com/mayfields-season-ends-on-the-sidelines-an-operation-awaits-the-browns-qb/ CLEVELAND (AP) – At least Baker Mayfield’s exit reunion went well. Just about everything else this season for the Browns quarterback was irrelevant. And while the season is over, his time in Cleveland is not so defined. Mayfield watched Sunday’s home final wearing a low cap on the sidelines as Cleveland closed a disappointing season […]]]>

CLEVELAND (AP) – At least Baker Mayfield’s exit reunion went well. Just about everything else this season for the Browns quarterback was irrelevant.

And while the season is over, his time in Cleveland is not so defined.

Mayfield watched Sunday’s home final wearing a low cap on the sidelines as Cleveland closed a disappointing season with a 21-16 victory over the Cincinnati Bengals – a victory that brought little comfort to a Browns who was supposed to do a lot more.

It was a disappointing end for Mayfield, whose attempt to play despite injuries all season led to inconsistencies in his performance. Mayfield, who is due to have surgery on Jan. 19 on his un-slender left shoulder, met with coach Kevin Stefanski on Friday to discuss a season that hasn’t gone as it should and how to improve in the ‘to come up.

It remains to be seen if it is together. There were obvious frustrations and the loss sparked speculation about a rift between the coach and the 26-year-old quarterback, although Stefanski said on Friday he had a “good relationship” with Mayfield.

Stefanski didn’t give any details of their conversation, but Mayfield left it on a positive note.

“He can’t wait and I can’t wait for him to have the surgery, to get rest, to be healthy and all those things,” Stefanski said.

Barring a major change, it looks like the Browns will be heading into the offseason with Mayfield as a starter for next season.

Mayfield is under an $ 18.9 million contract for next season after the Browns (8-9) exercised the option. The team haven’t spoken to their agents about a long-term extension, and the Browns’ reluctance to lock up Mayfield has led to speculation they might seek out his replacement.

Stefanksi was asked if he had discussed a plan with Mayfield to become the Cleveland starter.

“Obviously, this type of meeting is between me and the players,” Stefanski said. “I think a lot of those exit meetings are where they are, where their health is, where they’re going, what we can do better and stuff like that.”

If they can’t find a better option through a trade or a free agent signing, the Browns will have to stick with Mayfield, who has thrown seven interceptions in his last three games. He’ll have to be better on and off the pitch.

Mayfield, who injured his shoulder in Week 2 while trying to make a tackle after throwing an interception, failed to improve his teammates. He struggled with his accuracy and failed to deliver into the clutch.

Mayfield also didn’t help his case when he skipped a post-game interview session after a win over Detroit, and made headlines last week by angrily responding on social media to a report on his relationship with Stefanski by calling the Cleveland media.

On Sunday, Mayfield watched veteran substitute Case Keenum throw two touchdown passes and lead the Browns to a Bengals sweep (10-7) and third-place AFC North.

This is not how he envisioned the end of his season. That’s not what the Browns had in mind, either.

When the last seconds passed, Mayfield walked slowly through the tunnel into a rapidly emptying FirstEnergy stadium. There were some cheers as he left the pitch.

Just a year ago, after helping Cleveland end their long playoff drought and leading the Browns to a playoff victory in Pittsburgh, Mayfield looked destined to become the much-sought franchise quarterback. . He’s just a broken one.

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More AP NFL coverage: https://apnews.com/hub/NFL and https://twitter.com/AP_NFL



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Hells Angels debt collector eliminated in elaborate plot orchestrated by four assassins, prosecutor recounts murder trial https://ctxetg.com/hells-angels-debt-collector-eliminated-in-elaborate-plot-orchestrated-by-four-assassins-prosecutor-recounts-murder-trial/ Fri, 07 Jan 2022 22:01:16 +0000 https://ctxetg.com/hells-angels-debt-collector-eliminated-in-elaborate-plot-orchestrated-by-four-assassins-prosecutor-recounts-murder-trial/ Crown alleges four men on trial for first degree murder formed a quartet of assassins who played various roles in an elaborate plot to kill a Hells Angels debt collector in Mississauga in March 2019, the Brampton jury learned Friday. In his closing remarks to the jury, prosecutor Brian McGuire argued that the four men […]]]>

Crown alleges four men on trial for first degree murder formed a quartet of assassins who played various roles in an elaborate plot to kill a Hells Angels debt collector in Mississauga in March 2019, the Brampton jury learned Friday.

In his closing remarks to the jury, prosecutor Brian McGuire argued that the four men “acted as a team. They had a goal: it was murder, ”by Michael Deabaitua-Schulde, 32, of Mississauga, who was gunned down shortly after 11 a.m., moments after stepping out of a gymnasium in a busy square in Mississauga March 11, 2019.

The men were unaware that Deabaitua-Schulde was under police surveillance as part of an OPP investigation into his alleged involvement in an alleged elaborate illegal gambling operation. Deabaitua-Schulde was observed by police collecting and delivering packages to numerous people during the undercover operation, known as Project Hobart, the jury heard.

“It was not a robbery or a botched collection, but a planned and deliberate murder,” said McGuire, who added that the murder had the hallmarks of a gangland-type murder. “These men were supposed to be nowhere to be found.”

On the day of his murder, OPP investigators followed the rider to Huf Gym in Mississauga, where he did routine training. Police saw the biker running towards the gymnasium after being shot.

The Crown alleges that the two main shooters were Marckens Vilme and Brandon Reyes, Joseph Pallotta and Marc Issa El-Khoury serving as escape drivers at two separate locations. All four are charged with first degree murder.

“Both shooters had to ensure numerical superiority on their single target,” said McGuire, who added that Pallotta had led his co-accused to the scene of the murder, Huf Gym to the busy plaza of 700 Dundas St. E., near by Cawthra. Road, where Deabaitua-Schulde was filmed leaving after training.

“The silver revolver which we believe was used by Mr. Reyes has six empty cartridges in the cylinder,” McGuire said.

Deabaitua-Schulde, 32, a known member of the Niagara Region Hells Angels branch, was shot six times at close range, while standing next to his vehicle, then running to the gym to ask for help after being approached by several people wearing dark clothing. clothes outside the gym.

“Call 911!” the bloodied motorcycle gang member is heard pleading as he is seen on video running around the gym, as his pursuers fire another shot into the facility.

The killers used an untraceable blue Honda Civic whose license plates had been stolen days earlier, McGuire said in explaining how the plot was carried out. Police found phone messages referring to where the Honda with stolen license plates was left in Scarborough. The Crown alleges that Pallotta, who is filmed filling a gas can, set the Honda on fire after the murder.

Issa El-Khoury, driving a Hyundai Sante Fe, waited for the men at the meeting point on Rymal Road, Mississauga, in an attempt to chase them away after setting the car on fire, McGuire said. The men had originally traveled to Deabaitua-Schulde’s home in Mississauga to locate him, but he had already left for the gym.

The OPP surveillance team also spotted the Sante Fe on the morning of March 11, when it first visited the vicinity of Deabaitua-Schulde’s home in the Rymal Road area.

“They got caught because of two bad luck which tripped them up,” said McGuire, who added that the Hells Angels are sometimes targeted by their underground rivals, although the Crown is unable to determine who wanted. the death of Deabaitua-Schulde.

McGuire said the cars were linked to the murder when an OPP surveillance officer took a photo of Sante Fe license plates, after following the men in the Honda to the second meeting point on Rymal Road, a two minute drive to the shooting. scene.

Police found a burnt-out blue Honda Civic near Rymal Road and Tomken Road. Witnesses said the suspects fled the scene of the shooting in a Honda.

He said that Issa El-Khoury, while making sure the men escaped into the Sante Fe, escaped a trolling officer back to Toronto.

Police were able to link the men to the vehicles because two Peel police officers on patrol, by chance, decided to check the Quebec plates of the Sante Fe while it was parked in the parking lot of a Motel 6 in Brampton on the morning of murder.

McGuire said the four men were inside the motel finalizing the execution at the time.

“Bad luck!” McGuire said. “With these two pieces of information, the police were quickly able to locate Motel 6 as the starting point of the plan.”

Using videos of the men from Motel 6 and forensic evidence, “the four plotters were quickly arrested,” McGuire said.

McGuire said the plot began long before the shooting. The plaques were stolen in Scarborough on February 26. On the same day, a tracking device, placed on the Deabaitua-Schulde Jeep, began recording the location of the target. The device was manually checked at least 140 times from February 26 to the morning of March 11, the Crown said.

“It is clear that Mr. Deabaitua-Schulde was being followed,” said McGuire. Pallotta checked in at Motel 6 under a false name on March 7. “Now the conspirators just have to wait until he’s alone and vulnerable, and shoot him to death.”

Defense teams for Vilme and Reyes, who were 28 and 24 respectively at the time of the shooting, say the Crown failed to prove the charge of first degree murder. The two men were arrested by Montreal police a few days after the murder.

Lawyers for Pallotta, then 38, and Issa El-Khoury, then 26, also from Montreal, also argued that the Crown had failed to prove the charge against the two.

Vilme’s lawyer argued that he fired only one shot in the direction of the gymnasium. Pallotta’s attorney told the jury that his client set the Honda on fire and served as a driver but was not a gunman. Issa El-Khoury’s lawyer claimed he was fair to Vilme when the shooting took place.

Reyes’ defense team say he is only an afterthought because he helped Pallotta leave the city of Toronto, by purchasing a VIA train ticket.

The judge will give his final instructions to the jury next week.

Jason Miller is a Toronto reporter for The Star who covers crime and justice in the Peel region. Contact him by email: jasonmiller@thestar.ca or follow him on Twitter: @millermotionpic


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21 Highlights of 2021 | https://ctxetg.com/21-highlights-of-2021/ Thu, 06 Jan 2022 20:20:55 +0000 https://ctxetg.com/21-highlights-of-2021/ Philly DA A very personal hodgepodge of interviews, essays, reports and quotes that have accompanied me throughout (despite) this overloaded year of information. Crime and Punishment Jon Alpert’s HBO documentary Life of crime: 1984-2020 (DOC NYC curtain lifter for Nail hammer) Thirty-six years after three street criminals in Newark, the NJ culminates in a powerful […]]]>
Philly DA

A very personal hodgepodge of interviews, essays, reports and quotes that have accompanied me throughout (despite) this overloaded year of information.

Crime and Punishment

Jon Alpert’s HBO documentary Life of crime: 1984-2020 (DOC NYC curtain lifter for Nail hammer)

Thirty-six years after three street criminals in Newark, the NJ culminates in a powerful and carefully edited two-hour journey.

Stanley Nelson and Traci A. Curry’s Showtime documentary Attica (interview with Curry for Filmmaker magazine, interview with former inmate Al Victory for Documentary magazine)

A lucid review of the actual five-day event, made for television, which resulted in “the deadliest violence Americans have inflicted on themselves in a single day since the Civil War.” Half a century later, our most publicized prison uprising remains a buried story for all to see.

Alex Gibney’s HBO Docuseries The crime of the century (test for Modern day review)

Alex Gibney is emerging as America’s foremost film columnist of high-profile embezzlement, so mad they’d be hysterical if it weren’t downright deadly. And with two-part sound, nearly four hours, The crime of the century for HBO (presented in association with The Washington Post) he turns his lens on an easy, albeit long and slippery target: Big Pharma.


Ted Passon, Yoni Brook and Nicole Salazar PBS docuseries Philly DA (interview with Larry Krasner for Documentary magazine)

To say that longtime civil rights lawyer Larry Krasner was far from becoming the very head of the agency that had been his most despised enemy is an understatement. As one progressive skeptic puts it Philly DA, he had about as much chance as David Duke to take the reins of the ACLU. And yet, not only did Krasner win his election campaign in 2017, he did so in a landslide. And that’s when the real drama began.

The new queer wave

Angelo Madsen Minax’s documentary Tribeca North by current (interview for Filmmaker magazine)

Minax started shooting North by current on his return home to rural Michigan after the death of his niece, a toddler whose death has put Minax’s emotionally fragile sister and her formerly incarcerated husband in the crosshairs of the Protective Services. childhood (which led the police to investigate the CPS). The upsetting event also set the stage for a different kind of confrontation, between Minax himself and his Mormon parents who still felt grieving over the “loss” of their own child – a girl named Angela who had moved on to this. stranger with a camera filming in their living room.

Jordan Lord’s MoMA Doc Fortnight film Shared resources (Doc Fortnight cover for Filmmaker magazine)

Through a breathtaking conceptual framework – the director tells the whole process of making his film, providing a kind of transcription of transparency (up to recognizing the jump cuts, when they have removed sentences from a scene) – Lord strives to find a new formula of non-fiction. One that will allow the subjects, their parents – as they follow them through a five-year Chapter 13 bankruptcy (the ironic result of daddy’s loss from his job as a debt collector) – to act on a controversial portrayal on the screen. A sense of control that has long been absent from the couple’s real lives.

Nick Cammilleri and Zackary Drucker’s HBO docuseries The Lady and the Vale (interview for Filmmaker magazine)

This revolving saga stars a three-wheeled car called Dale (which may or may not have been viable) and its extraordinary marketer, a visionary woman entrepreneur (and longtime serial con artist) named Elizabeth Carmichael. With a promise of 70 miles per gallon at a time when the oil crisis of the 1970s left Americans linger in service stations on long Soviet lines, the Dale seemed to many a dream come true. And for others, too good to be true.

Sociopolitics and its discontents

Rachel Boynton Streaming Documentary Peacock Civil war (or, who do we think we are) (interview for Filmmaker magazine, review for Global comment)

Rachel Boynton’s latest doc (Big men, Our brand is the crisis) unfolds in a series of revelations. The project was sparked following the massacre of black parishioners at the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston, SC, during President Obama’s last year in office, and continued throughout the domestic terrorism of the Trump administration. Meanwhile, Boynton took a historic journey, crossing the United States from Massachusetts to Mississippi, with a singular question in mind: What is the history of the Civil War? Or more precisely, what is your history of civil war?

Spike Lee’s HBO Docuseries NYC Epicenters 9/11 → 2021½ (test for Modern day review)

For me – as for my fellow New Yorker Spike Lee, whose quartet for HBO Max NYC EPICENTERS 09/11/2021½ is both epic (half past seven!) and absolutely stunning – 9/11 was not an international or even a national news item. This shit was personal. A feeling very clear from the very first episode, which does not deal with this sudden tragedy, but with the slow crisis which, almost two decades later, would bring the Big Apple back to the “ground zero” scene.

Aliaksei Paluyan’s first documentary at the Berlinale Courage (CPH: DOX coverage for Documentary magazine)

Paluyan’s jaw-dropping film follows a trio of courageous Belarusian actors whose long-standing pro-democracy activism within the staged confines of the underground free theater unexpectedly becomes an unrepeatable reality on the streets.

Avi Mograbi’s first documentary at the Berlinale The First 54 Years: A Short Handbook for the Military Profession (CPH: DOX coverage for Documentary magazine)

Resembling an Orwellian webinar on covert extermination, this terrifying documentary stars the provocative Israeli director himself, who takes us on a half-century satirical journey into the heart of the insidious occupation of Gaza and the United States. West Bank by his country.

Unique bizarre

CPH Film: DOX / Fantasia Fest by Joonas Neuvonen Lost boys (interview with co-director Sadri Cetinkaya for Filmmaker magazine)

After serving a seven-year sentence for drug trafficking, protagonists Jani and Antti flee to Thailand to celebrate with Neuvonen and his camera. As you might expect, the 24 hour bacchanal revolves around sex, drugs, alcohol, more sex and more drugs. Unpredictably, as Neuvonen returns home at the end of the revelry, the duo instead choose to fly to Cambodia – where they quickly disappear. And then Jani is found dead, her disappearance officially declared suicide, and that verdict prompts Neuvonen to once again return to Southeast Asia in a Herculean effort to separate fact from fiction.

David Shapiro’s Sundance 2020 “Best DocuSeries” winner / New York theatrical premiere Untitled Pizza Movie (interview with David Shapiro for Nail hammer)

This seven-part “pizza” is actually a surprisingly crafted and poignant love letter to a bygone NYC (and best friend), with pizza served like red herring.

Visionaries of arthouse

Firouzeh Khosrovani’s 2020 IDFA Prize for the best documentary feature X-ray of a family (Full-frame cover for Filmmaker magazine, IDFA 2020 cover for Filmmaker magazine)

Born in Tehran, Khosrovani was only seven years old when the 1979 revolution divided society – and ultimately her own home. With X-ray of a family Khosrovani attempts to examine and understand, in the analytical and artistic manner of his secular radiologist and music-loving father, the hopes and disappointed dreams of both.

Salomé Jashi’s first Sundance documentary Tame the garden (interview for Filmmaker magazine, essay for Modern day review)

This “cinematic environmental parable” set on the Georgian coast centers on a rich and powerful man who has traveled to poor villages for years to pursue the strangest of hobbies – collecting majestic trees, many of which are their part. communities for over a century. .

Sergei Loznitsa’s IDFA 2021 Prize for the best film in the international competition Mr. Landsbergis (IDFA coverage for Documentary magazine)

Stunning and addicting four hours in length, Loznitsa’s latest masterpiece is a startling glimpse into the negotiations and backstage stabbing that led to Lithuania becoming the first independent country to emerge from the USSR. in the process of disintegration; and a Gorbachev counter-narrative told through a multitude of archival footage strung through candid interviews with the 89-year-old former President himself.

Words of wisdom

“It’s good to have power instead of outrage,” says Larry Krasner in docuseries Philly DA. Although in the last episode he added, “There is a danger in wielding this power. There is a danger that you will become what you fought against.

In Roadrunner, Anthony Bourdain asks Iggy Pop what he is passionate about now. “To be loved and truly appreciate the people who give me that,” he replies.

“What is freedom for Americans? Rhetorically asks a soldier in Netflix docuseries Turning point: September 11 and the war on terrorism. We want the “freedom to pretend.” We feel entitled to our fictions.

“Live as if you die tomorrow.” Learn as if you will live forever, ”urges a smuggler to The Devil’s Pilots, referring to Gandhi.

“We can only keep what we have by giving it”, says Deliris in Life of crime: 1984-2020.



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Foreclosures have cost Massachusetts homeowners nearly $ 100 million in equity since 2014 https://ctxetg.com/foreclosures-have-cost-massachusetts-homeowners-nearly-100-million-in-equity-since-2014/ Tue, 04 Jan 2022 21:08:04 +0000 https://ctxetg.com/foreclosures-have-cost-massachusetts-homeowners-nearly-100-million-in-equity-since-2014/ Homeowners in more than 30 towns and cities in Massachusetts have collectively lost an estimated $ 97 million in equity through foreclosures over a six-year period, according to a new study by the libertarian Pacific Legal Foundation. The losses are in part the result of an unusual policy that allows homeowners to lose everything, including […]]]>

Homeowners in more than 30 towns and cities in Massachusetts have collectively lost an estimated $ 97 million in equity through foreclosures over a six-year period, according to a new study by the libertarian Pacific Legal Foundation.

The losses are in part the result of an unusual policy that allows homeowners to lose everything, including any remaining equity in their home, in tax lien foreclosures in Massachusetts Land Court. Massachusetts is one of 12 states that allow this type of locking system.

The California-based legal organization calls the policy unconstitutional, citing a clause in the United States Constitution that prohibits the government from taking private property for public use without fair compensation. The group’s report reflects criticism from local housing advocates and some lawmakers, who have tried for years to reform state laws.

“The government should protect private property, not allow state-authorized theft,” the Pacific Legal Foundation report said. “When governments (or their agents) take a property, sell it, and hold onto all the proceeds – beyond what is owed on a debt related to that property – they are stealing money from some of the most vulnerable residents. of the Commonwealth. “

Several state lawmakers have proposed bills to overhaul tax lien laws, including better notice to landowners of their debt and explicit language on how the process can lead to equity participation in the land. both by municipal tax collectors and by private companies that buy back debts. then sue the foreclosure against the owners.

Forcelosures are not just the result of non-payment of a mortgage. Property owners can also be forced to default due to unpaid property taxes or even water or sewer bills.

The Massachusetts Collectors and Treasurers Association has always resisted reform bills, arguing that they would be expensive and complex for municipalities to implement.

Christopher Sweet, city of North Attleboro treasurer and collector and chairman of the state association, told GBH News he was open to talking about changes in state law, but said the Pacific Legal Foundation had exaggerated the scale of the problem.

“It sounds dramatic and it’s terrible – people are losing their homes and being foreclosed – but it’s not as widespread a problem as they describe in the report,” Sweet said. He said only a small fraction of the state’s millions of homeowners lost property to six-year tax lien foreclosures.

But local critics and the foundation argued that vulnerable homeowners are most likely to lose in such cases.

“It almost exclusively affects low-income people and the elderly who are housing rich and money poor,” said Todd Kaplan, consumer and housing lawyer at Greater Boston Legal Services. “When we see the number of people who have actually lost their homes, these are vulnerable people… and that’s why they lost their homes. ”


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In Idaho, legislative corruption is the norm | Opinion https://ctxetg.com/in-idaho-legislative-corruption-is-the-norm-opinion/ Sun, 02 Jan 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://ctxetg.com/in-idaho-legislative-corruption-is-the-norm-opinion/ This editorial was published by the Idaho Statesman of Boise. For a long time, Idaho was one of the few states in the country that did not take legislative corruption seriously. Lawmakers should change that this session by amending House and Senate rules to require recusal for conflict of interest. In the majority of states, […]]]>

This editorial was published by the Idaho Statesman of Boise.

For a long time, Idaho was one of the few states in the country that did not take legislative corruption seriously. Lawmakers should change that this session by amending House and Senate rules to require recusal for conflict of interest.

In the majority of states, it is illegal, unconstitutional, or a violation of legislative rules for a legislator to vote on a bill that will have a financial impact on him, his businesses, or his financial assets. But in Idaho, lawmakers simply have to declare their conflict.

That is, Idaho’s legislative rules explicitly allow legislative corruption, as long as it is transparent. Once a legislator announces his conflict, “the Member is presumed to act in good faith and in the public interest”, as the rules of the House indicate. This is a bad assumption.

There are recent and egregious examples of conflicts of interest that undermine public confidence that the Legislative Assembly is working in the interest of the general public.

The recent example of former Rep. Bryan Zollinger, R-Idaho Falls, was particularly glaring. Zollinger works as an attorney representing Medical Recovery Services, an eastern Idaho medical debt collector who has long been criticized for his abusive medical debt collection practices. In 2020, the Idaho Patient Act was drafted and introduced, largely to address SRM practices in particular.

Zollinger’s conflict of interest in this case was striking and obviously should have excluded him from the vote on the bill. But, following Idaho’s legislative rules, he debated and voted against the bill. It boggles the mind that he did it in the public interest rather than his own.

This is hardly the only case where members of the public have reason to suspect that the business of the Legislative Assembly is conducted with a special eye on the business interests of individual legislators.

As the Idaho Press’s Betsy Russell reported in the 2021 regular session, House State Affairs Committee Chairman Brent Crane struck down a bill that allowed county clerks to begin the process of compiling the postal ballots received before election day, which facilitates the rapid announcement of the results. . Crane, whose family owns a business involved in alarms and video surveillance, objected to some counties using YouTube to broadcast the ballot counting process in the interests of transparency.

In another case, Crane’s conflict of interest was even more acute. His company had lost a major alarm contract with the Boise School District after a series of fire department inspections. In 2021, he introduced legislation stemming from exactly this situation that would exempt alarm system upgrades from certain inspections, as Russell reported.

The public should not constantly doubt whether legislators are pursuing the public interest or their own.

There would be complications in creating a rule that ended legislative corruption in Idaho, but they are not insurmountable.

A common objection, for example, is that a large number of Idaho lawmakers are involved in agriculture. Should every farmer abstain from any vote on agricultural policy?

No. The general standard for conflict of interest rules is that a bill under consideration would affect a legislator substantially or significantly more than a member of the general public.

In many states, lawmakers make a conflict of interest declaration in writing long before their committee or chamber deals with legislation where they might have a conflict. This could be handed to their committee chair or their chamber chair, who, with the help of legal counsel, can determine whether a lawmaker should be excluded from the vote.

Lawmakers should review state rules that require recusal in response to a conflict of interest and draft their own. This would go a long way in ensuring that lawmakers are doing the people’s business in the people’s household, not theirs.


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“I’m going to have someone smash your head with a hammer” – chilling threat from debt collector to Wexford tenant https://ctxetg.com/im-going-to-have-someone-smash-your-head-with-a-hammer-chilling-threat-from-debt-collector-to-wexford-tenant/ Fri, 31 Dec 2021 13:32:00 +0000 https://ctxetg.com/im-going-to-have-someone-smash-your-head-with-a-hammer-chilling-threat-from-debt-collector-to-wexford-tenant/ “I’m going to have someone smash your head with a hammer.” “ It was one of the threats made against the tenant of a house in the suburb of Cromwellsfort in Wexford, who is said to be thousands of euros in late rent. The words, and others of a similar nature, were spoken by Alan […]]]>

“I’m going to have someone smash your head with a hammer.” “

It was one of the threats made against the tenant of a house in the suburb of Cromwellsfort in Wexford, who is said to be thousands of euros in late rent.

The words, and others of a similar nature, were spoken by Alan Nulty of 30 Rossmore Lawns, Templeogue, Dublin.

A man in his 50s learned he worked for a debt collection agency run by Martin Foley.

The result was a lawsuit handled by Judge Martin Nolan sitting on the Wexford Circuit Court.

Nulty pleaded guilty to uttering death threats or causing serious injury at 20 Holly Walk in Cromwellsfort on June 17 of last year.

The court heard how Garda Emer O’Reilly was called home on that date.

There she spoke to landlord David Allen who claimed her tenant Nigel Doolin owed her € 4,000 in rent.

He also said he used the debt collection agency run by Martin Foley.

The accused, Alan Nulty, was also present and he said he was there to collect property to cover the debt.

The guard heard a recording of a man with a Dublin accent who turned out to be the accused.

The recording was made through the door of the house by Doolin.

In addition to the threat of the hammer, the recording also detected a warning that the tenant would have his throat cut while walking his dog.

The Garda witness described the tone of the threats made by the accused as “persuasive”.

The court was told that the debt collection agency was to take 20 percent of whatever was collected.

Nulty told the Guard that he had no intention of following through on the threats he made.

A qualified electrician and father of three, he had worked for a security company for several years.

However, his ability to work had been affected by an arm injury suffered in a motorcycle accident four years ago.

The defense attorney admitted that what had happened at Holly Walk was totally unacceptable, describing it as “a spectacular lack of punctual judgment”.

The judge described the Cromwellsfort incident as an insidious crime with disturbing aspects and he decided to take a few days to formulate his decision.

When recalling the case, the judge noted that the tenant had been threatened in a very serious way.

What Nulty said was delivered in a way that made it believable, and Doolin was rightly terrified.

It was noted that no actual violence had taken place.

The seriousness of the incident was marked by the recording of a three-year prison sentence.

However, that sentence was suspended in its entirety once Nulty agreed to raise € 5,000 to offer the man he tried to intimidate.

“Your good record saved you,” Justice Nolan told the offender of the stay decision, “but it was a tight case. Courts don’t like heavyweights coming in to collect debts.


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My mom co-signed $ 82,000 of my student loans and it hurt our relationship https://ctxetg.com/my-mom-co-signed-82000-of-my-student-loans-and-it-hurt-our-relationship/ Tue, 28 Dec 2021 17:08:22 +0000 https://ctxetg.com/my-mom-co-signed-82000-of-my-student-loans-and-it-hurt-our-relationship/ My mom and I weren’t sure what we were getting into when we took out $ 82,000 in student loans. After I graduated, I had a hard time talking to my mom about money or getting her help. My mom and I discuss our finances more openly now that I’m older and plan to see […]]]>
  • My mom and I weren’t sure what we were getting into when we took out $ 82,000 in student loans.
  • After I graduated, I had a hard time talking to my mom about money or getting her help.
  • My mom and I discuss our finances more openly now that I’m older and plan to see a financial planner together.
  • Read more stories from Personal Finance Insider.

In 2010, I was so excited to be accepted into my dream school to study with teachers who seemed genuinely excited about the work they do outside of teaching. I was 18 and dreamed of becoming an architect, and I received $ 30,000 in merit scholarships.

FAFSA? Principal promissory note? I didn’t know what those words meant, and I really didn’t care. Without much research or consideration for my financial future, I signed all of the paperwork that the school needed me to sign so that I could register for classes as soon as possible.

To help pay for my education, my mom co-signed $ 82,000 in federal and private student loans, and even took out Parent PLUS loans. Neither of us really understood what we were signing up for, but she signed the papers anyway because she supported my dreams.

After I graduated I struggled to have an open conversation about money with my mom

Because I felt guilty about our joint debt, I treated her like a debt collector after graduation and avoided all her attempts to talk to me about money. I took it all too personally and closed. My problems snowballed until they became unbearable, and I only contacted her when I was in a crisis.

Even though my mom wanted to support me, I stubbornly tried to do it all on my own with an irregular income of $ 1,000 a month or less. I moved to New York after college and pretended everything was fine when I couldn’t afford to eat three meals a day and was racking up credit card debt for spending money. emergency.

These dynamics have strained our finances and, more importantly, our relationships.

My mom reminded me that we’re not the only ones dealing with the crippling effects of student debt

In 2017, I finally sat down with my mom to figure out how much interest was accrued on our joint debt and what the minimum monthly payments would look like. Even with a full time job, I was not ready to commit to the monthly payments. I cried completely in front of her and finally expressed how guilty I felt about all of our debts.

My mother said with kindness and gentleness, “You know we’re not the only ones dealing with this, right? It happens to everyone in the country. She also reminded me that I liked the college I chose. The four years I spent there shaped my worldview and led me to an exciting career that I love.

It made a huge difference for me to know that I was not alone. My mom is always around here, and it helps to know that millions of other Americans are pressuring President Biden to completely write off student loan debt.

Our relationship flourishes when I am financially independent

Now that I’m in a better financial situation, I can get back to what really matters: maintaining a healthy, honest relationship with my mom.

With my clear mind and focused on the future, I try to communicate with my mom as clearly as possible on all money matters. In the new year, we have agreed to schedule regular meetings with a financial planner to find solutions, especially since student loan cancellation may not include private loans.

Instead of fighting for the student loan debt I have accumulated on our behalf, I choose to honor the financial investment my mom made in me by getting my finances under control and pursuing my creative goals.

Feeling guilty and ashamed won’t change the past, but it will prevent me from staying present for my mother’s wise advice and her incredible sense of humor.


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Elderly Cheated Nearly RM700,000 Into Macau Scam https://ctxetg.com/elderly-cheated-nearly-rm700000-into-macau-scam/ Sat, 25 Dec 2021 05:10:00 +0000 https://ctxetg.com/elderly-cheated-nearly-rm700000-into-macau-scam/ JOHOR BARU: An elderly person lost almost RM700,000 of his savings after being duped by a suspect posing as a Bukit Aman policeman who wanted to investigate his bank account. Johor Police Chief, responsible for commercial crime, Amran Md Jusin, said the 74-year-old woman filed a police report on the case on Friday, December 24. […]]]>

JOHOR BARU: An elderly person lost almost RM700,000 of his savings after being duped by a suspect posing as a Bukit Aman policeman who wanted to investigate his bank account.

Johor Police Chief, responsible for commercial crime, Amran Md Jusin, said the 74-year-old woman filed a police report on the case on Friday, December 24.

“The victim, who worked as a car saleswoman in Kluang, received a phone call on December 16 from a stranger posing as an Inland Revenue Board (LHDN) agent, informing her that she had recorded a company with back taxes amounting to RM 55,800, “he said.

“She was then directed to a person in Bukit Aman by the name of ‘Datuk Suhaimi’, who then sent a link to the victim’s phone ordering him to fill in his personal and bank details,” added ACP Amran.

He then said in a statement on Saturday (December 25) that the victim had acceded to the crooks ‘request and provided his information and access to his bank account and to his siblings’ joint bank account.

ACP Amran added that the person then ordered the victim to transfer all of his personal savings to the crooks’ account under the pretext of investigating the account.

“The victim then transferred 312,795 RM to the crooks’ account, and there was still about 400,000 RM left in his account and the joint account.

However, on December 24, the victim performed checks on his bank account and discovered that there had been unknown transfers from his account to an unknown account between Tuesday (December 21) and Friday (December 24).

“A total of RM 697,000 was transferred via ‘Duit Now’. The victim realized she had been duped and filed a police report the same day,” he said, adding that the matter was under investigation under section 420 of the Act. Penal code for cheating.

ACP Amran also said members of the public should always make sure they are dealing with the right people or the right company.

“We also encourage the public to use the ‘Semak Mule’ website or app to check any suspicious accounts or CCID’s Facebook page for any information on commercial crime,” he said.

The term “Macau Scam” was coined because it is believed to originate from Macau or that the first victims came from there. This has never been confirmed.

The scam often begins with a phone call from someone posing as an agent of a bank, government agency, or debt collector.

The scammer will then claim that the potential victim owes money or has an unpaid fine, often with a very short window of less than an hour, to settle the payment or face “dire consequences”.

These unsuspecting victims will then be asked to make payments to bail them out.


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