Debt Collector – CTXETG http://ctxetg.com/ Thu, 07 Oct 2021 08:24:39 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://ctxetg.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-150x150.png Debt Collector – CTXETG http://ctxetg.com/ 32 32 Debt and Disability: Preventing Future Financial Problems https://ctxetg.com/debt-and-disability-preventing-future-financial-problems/ https://ctxetg.com/debt-and-disability-preventing-future-financial-problems/#respond Thu, 07 Oct 2021 00:14:38 +0000 https://ctxetg.com/debt-and-disability-preventing-future-financial-problems/ If you were to become disabled, would you be able to pay your bills? This is a serious question and one that most people do not give enough consideration to because we all prefer to believe that disability could not happen to us. In reality, however, the CDC reports that one in four American adults […]]]>

If you were to become disabled, would you be able to pay your bills? This is a serious question and one that most people do not give enough consideration to because we all prefer to believe that disability could not happen to us.

In reality, however, the CDC reports that one in four American adults have a disability, although this does not prevent them from working. It’s a good reminder that we should all anticipate this possibility, but it’s important that you understand the legal and financial issues that can come into play if your ability to work changes.

Social security: the elephant in the room

One of the most common misconceptions about disability and finances is that if you were to become disabled, you would be financially supported by Social Security, as well as other social protection programs like Medicaid.

Unfortunately, not only Social Security should be insolvent by 2033, but it is very difficult to qualify for disability benefits and they tend to be quite minimal even if you qualify. Thus, the majority of people with severe disabilities live below the poverty line, especially if they have never been able to work or have worked very little before acquiring their disability.

Alternative supports: Private disability insurance

Since Social Security programs can be so difficult to access, another option you might want to consider is investing in a private disability insurance policy. Just like other insurance policies, these plans exist to provide you with essential financial support, and they tend to be much more flexible and generous than federal programs.

Fonts, such as those offered by Breeze Long Term Disability Insurance, are a good option to replace part of your income if you become unable to work due to illness or injury. These policies allow you to face your bills while focusing on your recovery, rehabilitation or treatment.

Another advantage of private policies is that, unlike SSI and SSDI, you can still collect part of your long-term disability insurance if you have to have a less intensive and lower paying job due to your health. A private policy will almost certainly pay faster than you might qualify for any federal program.

Facing your debt: negotiations and discharge

Since your finances may suffer if you become disabled, it is important that you have a plan to deal with your existing debt. Paying it off can become excessively heavy, even if the amount is quite small. Fortunately, you have a few options on this front.

First, if you are late with payments and these invoices are collected, you can negotiate with the collection agency. Most are allowed to take a reduced payment upfront; especially for older debts, collection agencies usually buy debts from the original creditor for a reduced amount in the hope of making some profit. Many will go even lower than that first reduced amount in order to settle the bill – especially if you can prove that the disability has hurt your financial situation since the debt was incurred.

Another common debt that people face when they become disabled is student debt. Americans are in the midst of a student debt crisis, and contrary to popular belief, it’s the less educated people – often those with incomplete college degrees or a bachelor’s degree from a local college – who tend to have the most unmanageable debt.

Fortunately, if you have federal student loans, you may be eligible for the government program. disability-based loan release program. Again, it may take a while to get approved for this program, but if you can cut down on the bureaucracy, it will wipe out your debt.

It’s understandable that people are afraid to talk about disability and are even more willing to actively plan for it, but ignoring the problem won’t make it go away. You need to know what resources might be available to you and have a plan for your financial future. You’ll have a lot of work to do if you become disabled, so tackle it now so you don’t have to worry about it later.


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Review: ‘The Many Saints of Newark’ https://ctxetg.com/review-the-many-saints-of-newark/ https://ctxetg.com/review-the-many-saints-of-newark/#respond Tue, 05 Oct 2021 22:30:17 +0000 https://ctxetg.com/review-the-many-saints-of-newark/ “The Many Saints of Newark”, a New Line Cinema release, is rated R. Running time 120 minutes. Two and a half stars out of four. (AP Pictures) When “The Sopranos” is brought up these days, it’s usually for the nebulous way it ended: that now famous blackout in a crowded restaurant while Journey’s “Don’t Stop […]]]>

“The Many Saints of Newark”, a New Line Cinema release, is rated R. Running time 120 minutes. Two and a half stars out of four. (AP Pictures)

When “The Sopranos” is brought up these days, it’s usually for the nebulous way it ended: that now famous blackout in a crowded restaurant while Journey’s “Don’t Stop Believin ‘” plays. . Whether Tony Soprano lived or died is still the subject of heated debate.

The real death in 2013 of the great James Gandolfini put an end to hopes of putting this debate to bed, but David Chase, the creator and showrunner of “The Sopranos”, oddly kept the show alive with the new prequel film “The Many. Saints of Newark. “

It’s intriguing mainly because the film evokes the greatest character ever created for television but doesn’t put him in the middle. Tony Soprano is a cameo in his own origin film.

Instead, the guy in the middle is Tony’s self-styled uncle Dickie Moltisanti, played with real verve by Alessandro Nivola. Mafia boss Moltisanti is the guy young Tony admires. But he’s riddled with the same flaws Tony will soon share: possessiveness, quick to anger, methodical and yet impulsive, business-inclined, and eager to consume copious amounts of pork products.

In a stroke of genius, the older of the two young Tony Sopranos in the film is played by Michael Gandolfini, the late actor’s son who shares his father’s expressive, bearded big and sad eyes. He’s fascinating.

All the old gangs – now rejuvenated with new actors, of course – are there: Uncle June, Livia Soprano, Paulie Walnuts, Silvio Dante, Pussy Bonpensiero, Janice Soprano, Jackie Aprile, Carmela and even Christopher Moltisanti, son of Dickie Moltisanti .

Michael Imperioli is back as a young Moltisanti and he seems to have a bit of weight about his former mentor, Tony Soprano, because of the older man who suffocated him to death in 2007. So he tells invisible from the grave.

This leads to one of the funniest moments in the movie: When a baby Moltisanti is introduced by his mother to the family but gets too close to Tony, the baby bursts into tears. “It’s like I’m scaring him or something,” Tony shrugs.

The danger here is that the new actors have a blueprint for what their characters will look and sound like in the future.

One issue here is time, something the film obviously plays with. “The Many Saints of Newark” comes 14 years after the end of “The Sopranos” and it may be too long for anyone but the most ardent fan to keep up. The brain strives to connect new faces with old ones.

The plot is really only a few slices of years ago in and around Newark, New Jersey, in the late 1960s and early 1970s. The DiMeo crime family – of which the Sopranos are a crew – tries to stay afloat during the civil unrest that includes the deadly riots of 1967. But the film sags in many parts, never reaching the series’ focused tension and often seems aimless. If you are not already a fan, this might sound like “Goodfellas” lite.

A formidable Leslie Odom Jr. plays Harold McBrayer, a low-level debt collector who will soon attempt to lead his own team. Ray Liotta wonderfully plays not one but two characters – Dickie’s dead-eyed father and also Dickie’s philosophical and imprisoned uncle. If you are a fan of “The Sopranos”, you will know that Dickie Moltisanti does not appear in the HBO series. You will learn why.

But what about Tony Soprano? How does he become the anxious gangster and father, caught up in the old and the new, as likely to gut an informant brutally as he is to collapse and cry when he hears The Chi-Lite’s “Oh Girl” on his car stereo?

We leave it to the dawn of virility, always oscillating between criminality and innocence.

There is a revelation of what will become her trigger temper, but also a willingness to embrace a mental health aide, which will one day lead to a psychiatrist’s couch. He’s about 20 at the end of the movie, too early to see what really made him.

Credit “The Many Saints of Newark” – screenplay by Chase and Lawrence Konner, and directed by series regular Alan Taylor – for trying to tackle generational violence, structural racism and opening up a story to add more than Italo-Americans shooting each other by branching off onto gabagool plates.

But that’s not enough. Tony is as mysterious at the end of “The Many Saints of Newark” as he is at the sudden end of “The Sopranos”. Maybe it is as it should be. Maybe there is room for another prequel.


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court finds plaintiff lacks standing to assert claim with FDCPA based on disputed credit information | Man’s pepper with trout https://ctxetg.com/court-finds-plaintiff-lacks-standing-to-assert-claim-with-fdcpa-based-on-disputed-credit-information-mans-pepper-with-trout/ https://ctxetg.com/court-finds-plaintiff-lacks-standing-to-assert-claim-with-fdcpa-based-on-disputed-credit-information-mans-pepper-with-trout/#respond Tue, 05 Oct 2021 15:56:25 +0000 https://ctxetg.com/court-finds-plaintiff-lacks-standing-to-assert-claim-with-fdcpa-based-on-disputed-credit-information-mans-pepper-with-trout/ In Tolliver v. Nat’l Credit Sys., Inc., n ° 20-cv-728-jdp (WD Wis. September 22, 2021), the Western District of Wisconsin found that the plaintiff lacked standing to assert his claims for violation of the Fair Debt Collections Practices Act (FDCPA), in which he alleged that a debt collector failed to notify agencies Information on Consumers […]]]>

In Tolliver v. Nat’l Credit Sys., Inc., n ° 20-cv-728-jdp (WD Wis. September 22, 2021), the Western District of Wisconsin found that the plaintiff lacked standing to assert his claims for violation of the Fair Debt Collections Practices Act (FDCPA), in which he alleged that a debt collector failed to notify agencies Information on Consumers (CRA) that the plaintiff was disputing the debts in question.

Plaintiff Scott Tolliver had a pair of debts with defendant National Credit related to past due rents. He claims to have sent letters to National Credit, disputing these debts in August 2019. Because National Credit did not report the disputed debts to the rating agencies, he filed a lawsuit, alleging violations of Section 1692e ( 8) of the FDCPA, which prohibits debt collectors from “[c]Communicating or threatening to disclose to anyone credit information that is known or should be known to be false, including failure to communicate that a disputed debt is disputed.

National Credit denied ever having received the letter in question and disputed whether Tolliver had standing to assert his claims. The court ruled that although the defendant had received the letters, Tolliver’s claims did not demonstrate that he had suffered prejudice in fact and granted summary judgment to Credit National.

In arguing that he had standing to present his claims, Tolliver asserted that he had suffered four tangible damages: (1) the risk of financial harm caused by inaccurate information on his credit report; (2) reputational damage caused by National Credit providing false information to credit reporting agencies; (3) emotional distress; and (4) the time and resources spent due to the violation of the FDCPA by National Credit.

The court rejected the first argument, finding that Tolliver had produced no evidence to show that National Credit’s failure to notify rating agencies of its dispute had damaged its credit or created a risk of financial harm. In addition, she concluded that her claim for damage to reputation in this context was identical to her claim for risk of financial harm. Regarding the allegation of emotional distress, the court held that “being ‘confused and aggravated’ because of misinformation that violates the FDCPA is not in itself prejudice, in the absence of other prejudice. concrete. “Finally, the court dismissed Tolliver’s claim that the time he spent and the expenses he incurred in bringing his lawsuit constituted prejudice, stating:”[i]If the time spent on a legal action was sufficient to give standing for the same legal action, then a claimant would have standing. all Case.”

This case provides another example of standing requirements in the context of claims under the FDCPA. In addition to establishing a technical violation of the law, claimants must demonstrate that they suffered actual and tangible harm in order for their claims to survive.


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Review: “The Sopranos” Prequel Made For TV Fans | Way of life https://ctxetg.com/review-the-sopranos-prequel-made-for-tv-fans-way-of-life/ https://ctxetg.com/review-the-sopranos-prequel-made-for-tv-fans-way-of-life/#respond Mon, 04 Oct 2021 16:00:00 +0000 https://ctxetg.com/review-the-sopranos-prequel-made-for-tv-fans-way-of-life/ (PA) – When “The Sopranos” is brought up these days, it’s usually for the nebulous way it ended: that now famous blackout in a crowded restaurant while Journey’s “Don’t Stop Believin ‘” play. Whether Tony Soprano lived or died is still the subject of heated debate. The real death in 2013 of the great James […]]]>

(PA) – When “The Sopranos” is brought up these days, it’s usually for the nebulous way it ended: that now famous blackout in a crowded restaurant while Journey’s “Don’t Stop Believin ‘” play. Whether Tony Soprano lived or died is still the subject of heated debate.

The real death in 2013 of the great James Gandolfini put an end to hopes of putting this debate to bed, but David Chase, the creator and showrunner of “The Sopranos”, oddly kept the show alive with the new prequel film “The Many. Saints of Newark. “

It’s intriguing mainly because the film evokes the greatest character ever created for television but doesn’t put him in the middle. Tony Soprano is a cameo in his own origin film.

Instead, the guy in the center is Tony’s self-styled uncle Dickie Moltisanti, played with real verve by Alessandro Nivola. Mafia boss Moltisanti is the guy young Tony admires. But he’s riddled with the same flaws Tony will soon share: possessiveness, quick to anger, methodical and yet impulsive, business-inclined, and eager to consume copious amounts of pork products.

In a stroke of genius, the older of the two young Tony Sopranos in the film is played by Michael Gandolfini, the late actor’s son who shares his father’s expressive, bearded big and sad eyes. He’s fascinating.

All the old gangs – now rejuvenated with new actors, of course – are there: Uncle June, Livia Soprano, Paulie Walnuts, Silvio Dante, Pussy Bonpensiero, Janice Soprano, Jackie Aprile, Carmela and even Christopher Moltisanti, son of Dickie Moltisanti .

Michael Imperioli is back as a young Moltisanti and he seems to have a bit of weight about his former mentor, Tony Soprano, because of the older man who suffocated him to death in 2007. He therefore tells invisible from the grave.

This leads to one of the funniest moments in the movie: When a baby Moltisanti is introduced by his mother to the family but gets too close to Tony, the baby bursts into tears. “It’s like I’m scaring him or something,” Tony shrugs.

The danger here is that the new actors have a blueprint for what their characters will look and sound like in the future. For the most part, they avoid the caricature – like Vera Farmiga nailing Tony’s fearsome mother and Corey Stoll brilliantly capturing the small and irritable Junior. But John Magaro makes fun of Silvio, Stevie Van Zandt’s consigliere a little too much.

One issue here is time, something the film obviously plays with. “The Many Saints of Newark” comes 14 years after the end of “The Sopranos” and it may be too long for anyone but the most ardent fan to keep up. The brain strives to connect new faces with old ones.

The plot is really only a few slices of years ago in and around Newark, New Jersey, in the late 1960s and early 1970s. The DiMeo crime family – of which the Sopranos are a crew – tries to stay afloat during the civil unrest that includes the deadly riots of 1967. But the film slumps in many parts, never reaching the series’ focused tension and often seems aimless. If you are not already a fan, this might sound like “Goodfellas” lite.

A formidable Leslie Odom Jr. plays Harold McBrayer, a low-level debt collector who will soon attempt to lead his own team. Ray Liotta wonderfully plays not one but two characters – Dickie’s dead-eyed father and also Dickie’s philosophical and imprisoned uncle. If you are a fan of “The Sopranos”, you will know that Dickie Moltisanti does not appear in the HBO series. You will learn why.

But what about Tony Soprano? How does he become the anxious gangster and father, caught up in the old and the new, as likely to gut an informant brutally as he is to collapse and cry when he hears “Oh Girl” by The Chi-Lite on his car stereo?

We leave it to the dawn of virility, always oscillating between criminality and innocence. Yes, he helps hijack a Mr. Softee truck, but gives all the ice cream. Yes, he takes a pair of stolen speakers, but regrets it. “I’m trying to be good,” he said to his uncle.

There is a revelation of what will become her trigger temper, but also a willingness to embrace mental health aide, which will one day lead to a psychiatrist’s couch. He’s about 20 at the end of the movie, too early to see what really made him.

Credit “The Many Saints of Newark” – screenplay by Chase and Lawrence Konner, and directed by series regular Alan Taylor – for trying to tackle generational violence, structural racism and opening up a story to add more than Italo-Americans shooting each other by branching off into gabagool plates.

But that’s not enough. Tony is as mysterious at the end of “The Many Saints of Newark” as he is at the sudden end of “The Sopranos”. Maybe it is as it should be. Maybe there is room for another prequel.

“The Many Saints of Newark,” a New Line Cinema release, is rated R for its strong violence, pervasive language, sexual content, and some nudity. It’s in theaters and HBO Max Friday with a duration of 120 minutes. Two and a half stars out of four.


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Medical debt is different, so avoid this joint savings strategy https://ctxetg.com/medical-debt-is-different-so-avoid-this-joint-savings-strategy/ https://ctxetg.com/medical-debt-is-different-so-avoid-this-joint-savings-strategy/#respond Sun, 03 Oct 2021 13:00:00 +0000 https://ctxetg.com/medical-debt-is-different-so-avoid-this-joint-savings-strategy/ Medical debt is different, so avoid this joint savings strategy If healthcare bills are piling up and your finances are strained, you’ll want to explore every avenue you can to take back control of your budget. Refinancing and consolidation are popular remedies for other types of debt, such as high interest credit card debt. You […]]]>

Medical debt is different, so avoid this joint savings strategy

If healthcare bills are piling up and your finances are strained, you’ll want to explore every avenue you can to take back control of your budget.

Refinancing and consolidation are popular remedies for other types of debt, such as high interest credit card debt. You have just taken out a new loan with better terms and used it for repay your old balances.

But these common solutions can do more harm than good when it comes to health care bills. Medical debt is special – and the good news is, it gives you a lot more options.

Before you act, know that medical debt is different

Benjamin Franklin on Money Wearing a Mask

Ricardo Reitmeyer / Shutterstock

Since hospital bills are often unexpected and severe, medical debts are very common. Almost one in five Americans are sued by collectors for unpaid medical bills, with a combined total of $ 140 billion.

It sounds bad – and it is – but medical debt differs from other types in three important ways.

First, it is usually interest free or has a very low interest rate.

Second, if you stop paying and your debt is collected (often about three months late), it won’t ruin your credit right away. Major credit bureaus give you a 180-day grace period before listing past due debt on your credit reports, giving you more time to pay it off.

Finally, some credit scoring models treat medical debt less harshly than others, so it might not cause as much damage. And if you can convince your insurer to reimburse the collection agency, the credit bureaus can remove the black mark from your credit reports sooner.

So what’s the deal with refinancing?

Woman with furrowed brow at computer

fizkes / Shutterstock

On the surface, medical debt consolidation works the same way as credit card debt consolidation: You are replacing all your problematic balances with a new loan that is more suitable for you.

This will leave you with a single payment to manage. You won’t need to keep track of many invoices with varying amounts and due dates.

Sounds pretty convenient, but unless you’re already paying interest on your medical bills, you’ll increase costs by switching to a Personal loan, line of credit or credit card.

Even if your credit score is in good shape and you can snag an interest-free credit card promotion, you won’t have much time before the problem gets worse.

Not only that, you will lose all the special protections attached to medical debt once you turn it into conventional debt.

Another potential reason to refinance would be to extend your debt over a longer period of time. This could lower your monthly payments and help you avoid defaults. But you might be able to get the same result if you just ask your creditor for help.

Other Ways to Manage Your Medical Debt

Consult a medical bill

jittawit21 / Shutterstock

Instead of replacing your debt, see if you can reduce your burden with any of the following options:

Talk to your financial aid providers

Try to negotiate a payment plan with your creditor, whether it’s a hospital, doctor, lab, or some combination. Ask if you can break the bill down into more manageable payments over a longer period of time.

The Affordable Care Act (ACA) actually requires some nonprofit hospitals to provide financial assistance to low-income patients.

Although the ACA does not specify the exact terms of this aid, the nonprofit Patient Advocate Foundation says the discounts range from 10% to 100% amortization.

“Don’t assume that income or assets (like home ownership) exclude you from eligibility for financial assistance,” he adds in a commentary. report. “A person who earns $ 100,000 a year but has $ 25,000 in medical expenses could be eligible for assistance even though it does not initially appear that they would qualify. “

You can also find out if your state has its own medical debtor protection laws. On half of the states specify eligibility based on income and specify the type of assistance a hospital must offer, according to the National Consumer Law Center.

Look closely at your medical bills

Just as credit reports often contain errors that hurt your credit score, billing errors could make your debt worse.

For example, you may have been billed higher rates than allowed by your insurer, or you may have charged unauthorized charges under your coverage.

If you find any errors or unauthorized charges, contact your health care provider and insurance company for resolution.

Call for some support

If you’re feeling overwhelmed, enrolling in a debt management program may be a better way to consolidate your bills.

To do this, use a reputable credit counselor to help you manage your bills and create a payment arrangement between you and your creditors. American Consumer Credit Counseling and the National Foundation for Credit Counseling are two nonprofit companies that provide this service, although not all of their services are free.

A similar option is to hire a medical billing lawyer. Some people do this if they are trying to manage a chronic medical situation or if they are having difficulty getting their treatment paid for by their insurance company.

These professionals promise to negotiate for you, help reduce charges on your bills, and make sure you don’t pay more than you should. Some charge by the hour or take a percentage of the money you’ve saved with their help.

Since this type of career is relatively new, you need to make sure that you hire a reputable lawyer. Two places you can go to learn more are the Alliance of Professional Health Advocates and the National Association of Healthcare Advocacy.

How to free up money and avoid more debt

Person with graphs and a calculator

Worawee Meepian / Shutterstock

Once your medical debt is in the most manageable form possible, you will still need to find the money within your budget to make your monthly payments. And sometimes refinancing can to help.

If you own your home, your first course of action should be to find out how much you could save by refinancing your mortgage. Some 13.9 million mortgage borrowers could save an average of $ 293 per month with a refi, according to Mortgage Technology and data provider Black Knight.

Keep in mind that the best interest rates go to borrowers with the highest credit scores. If your bills lowered your score, use a free credit monitoring service to assess the damage and get advice on the fastest way to improve it.

Next, take a look at your insurance policies; studies show that you could be paying thousands of dollars in excess per year. Start by using a quote comparison site to verify a best rate on your home insurance, then use the same strategy to save on your auto insurance.

Finally, to avoid unbearable medical bills in the future, try not to go without health insurance for a period of time – and shop around to determine if you have. the best health insurance you can afford.

National open enrollment periods begin in November for many insurance plans, and the federal government recently extended open enrollment for market plans by 30 days. Many states have also extended their open registration dates.

This article provides information only and should not be construed as advice. It is provided without warranty of any kind.


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Review: “The Sopranos” Prequel Made For TV Fans | AP Entertainment https://ctxetg.com/review-the-sopranos-prequel-made-for-tv-fans-ap-entertainment/ https://ctxetg.com/review-the-sopranos-prequel-made-for-tv-fans-ap-entertainment/#respond Sat, 02 Oct 2021 04:00:00 +0000 https://ctxetg.com/review-the-sopranos-prequel-made-for-tv-fans-ap-entertainment/ When “The Sopranos” is brought up these days, it’s usually for the nebulous way it ended: that now famous moonlighting in a crowded restaurant while Journey’s “Don’t Stop Believin ‘” plays. . Whether Tony Soprano lived or died is still the subject of heated debate. The real death in 2013 of the great James Gandolfini […]]]>

When “The Sopranos” is brought up these days, it’s usually for the nebulous way it ended: that now famous moonlighting in a crowded restaurant while Journey’s “Don’t Stop Believin ‘” plays. . Whether Tony Soprano lived or died is still the subject of heated debate.

The real death in 2013 of the great James Gandolfini put an end to hopes of putting this debate to bed, but David Chase, the creator and showrunner of “The Sopranos,” curiously kept the show alive with the new prequel film. “The Many Saints of Newark.”

It’s intriguing mainly because the film evokes the greatest character ever created for television but doesn’t put him in the middle. Tony Soprano is a cameo in his own origin film.

Instead, the guy in the middle is Tony’s self-styled uncle Dickie Moltisanti, played with real verve by Alessandro Nivola. Mafia boss Moltisanti is the guy young Tony admires. But he’s riddled with the same flaws Tony will soon share: possessiveness, quick to anger, methodical and yet impulsive, business-inclined, and eager to consume copious amounts of pork products.

In a stroke of genius, the older of the two young Tony Sopranos in the film is played by Michael Gandolfini, the late actor’s son who shares his father’s expressive, bearded big and sad eyes. He’s fascinating.

All the old gangs – now rejuvenated with new actors, of course – are there: Uncle June, Livia Soprano, Paulie Walnuts, Silvio Dante, Pussy Bonpensiero, Janice Soprano, Jackie Aprile, Carmela and even Christopher Moltisanti, son of Dickie Moltisanti .

Michael Imperioli is back as a young Moltisanti and he seems to have a bit of weight about his former mentor, Tony Soprano, because of the older man who suffocated him to death in 2007. He therefore tells invisible from the grave.

This leads to one of the funniest moments in the movie: When a baby Moltisanti is introduced by his mother to the family but gets too close to Tony, the baby bursts into tears. “It’s like I’m scaring him or something,” Tony shrugs.

The danger here is that the new actors have a blueprint for what their characters will look and sound like in the future. For the most part, they avoid the caricature – like Vera Farmiga nailing Tony’s fearsome mother and Corey Stoll brilliantly capturing the small and irritable Junior. But John Magaro makes fun of Silvio, Stevie Van Zandt’s consigliere a little too much.

One issue here is time, something the film obviously plays with. “The Many Saints of Newark” comes 14 years after the end of “The Sopranos” and it may be too long for anyone but the most ardent fan to keep up. The brain strives to connect new faces with old ones.

The plot is really only a few slices of years ago in and around Newark, New Jersey, in the late 1960s and early 1970s. The DiMeo crime family – of which the Sopranos are a crew – tries to stay afloat during the civil unrest that includes the deadly riots of 1967. But the film sags in many parts, never reaching the series’ focused tension and often seems aimless. If you are not already a fan, this might sound like “Goodfellas” lite.

A formidable Leslie Odom Jr. plays Harold McBrayer, a low-level debt collector who will soon attempt to lead his own team. Ray Liotta wonderfully plays not one but two characters – Dickie’s dead-eyed father and also Dickie’s philosophical and imprisoned uncle. If you are a fan of “The Sopranos”, you will know that Dickie Moltisanti does not appear in the HBO series.

You will learn why.

But what about Tony Soprano? How does he become the anxious gangster and father, caught up in the old and the new, as likely to gut an informant brutally as he is to collapse and cry when he hears “Oh Girl” by The Chi-Lite on his car stereo?

We leave it to the dawn of virility, always oscillating between criminality and innocence. Yes, he helps hijack a Mr. Softee truck, but gives all the ice cream. Yes, he takes a pair of stolen speakers, but regrets it. “I’m trying to be good,” he said to his uncle.

There is a revelation of what will become her trigger temper, but also a willingness to embrace the mental health aide, which will one day lead to a psychiatrist’s couch. He’s about 20 at the end of the movie, too early to see what really made him.

Credit “The Many Saints of Newark” – screenplay by Chase and Lawrence Konner, and directed by series regular Alan Taylor – for trying to tackle generational violence, structural racism and opening up a story to add more than Italo-Americans shooting each other by branching off into gabagool plates.

But that’s not enough. Tony is as mysterious at the end of “The Many Saints of Newark” as he is at the sudden end of “The Sopranos”. Maybe it is as it should be. Maybe there is room for another prequel.

“The Many Saints of Newark,” a New Line Cinema release, is rated R for its strong violence, pervasive language, sexual content, and some nudity. It’s in theaters and HBO Max Friday with a duration of 120 minutes. Two and a half stars out of four.

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MPAA definition of R: Restricted. Children under 17 must be accompanied by a parent or adult guardian.

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In line: https://www.warnerbros.com/movies/many-saints-newark

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Mark Kennedy is at http://twitter.com/KennedyTwits

Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.



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Lesley Weidenbener: The jury function is a civic duty which is also educational https://ctxetg.com/lesley-weidenbener-the-jury-function-is-a-civic-duty-which-is-also-educational/ https://ctxetg.com/lesley-weidenbener-the-jury-function-is-a-civic-duty-which-is-also-educational/#respond Sat, 02 Oct 2021 03:58:01 +0000 https://ctxetg.com/lesley-weidenbener-the-jury-function-is-a-civic-duty-which-is-also-educational/ I’m on a jury this week in a Marion County civil case that I can’t tell you anything about, although I really, really would. It took a toll on my week, mainly because of my poor planning. And the truth is, I wasn’t that worried about planning around that. Conventional wisdom says lawyers don’t put […]]]>

I’m on a jury this week in a Marion County civil case that I can’t tell you anything about, although I really, really would.

It took a toll on my week, mainly because of my poor planning. And the truth is, I wasn’t that worried about planning around that. Conventional wisdom says lawyers don’t put journalists on their juries. We can be overly skeptical, critical and frustrated with the way someone else asks questions.

But on Monday, after a brief wait in the boardroom of the City-County building, and then a host of questions from attorneys trying to determine if the potential jurors could be fair, I was among seven (six jurors and a deputy) having sworn to hear a case which, again, I cannot speak to. It really kills me.

But I can tell you a little bit about the experience of being a juror (although I’m writing this before I have to sort out what I think is a difficult judgment).

First, the jury duty is really a civic duty. I believe deep inside, despite my worry about telling a good friend that I couldn’t help her pick out her wedding dress on Monday and telling the IBJ publisher that I wouldn’t be able to moderate a long-planned event on Thursday. I know that our justice system depends on plaintiffs and defendants having their day in court, with the right to have their cases reviewed by their peers. It is the backbone of our democracy.

But second, jury service is an amazing learning experience. I have spent many hours covering hearings and court decisions. Yet seeing a trial from a juror’s perspective opens a whole new window into the process. And I was impressed by the jury coordinators, the lawyers, the judge and especially the bailiff, the person with whom the jury spends the most time chatting and who was particularly kind and helpful.

And, finally, I really appreciate my smart and savvy fellow jurors. It is a group that is alarmingly racially non-diverse. In Marion County, where 28% of residents are black and 11% Hispanic, it is inconceivable that a jury would be all white, but my group is just that. I promise to write more about this in a future column, once I have had a chance to do some research.

But in other ways our group is quite diverse. There are three jurors aged 30 and under: a debt collector, a bank examiner, and a university maintenance worker. Three of us are over 50: me, a man who works in finance at a company that makes bicycle tires and another who is retired after working for the US Department of Defense. In between, we have an IT specialist who works in a fast growing tech company.

Each juror carefully follows the case, takes notes and asks questions. (Yes! Indiana jurors can submit questions to witnesses, which the judge will determine whether to ask them.) We’re juggling big binders of evidence (COVID means at least there’s a seat between each of us, which I use almost as a table).

As of this writing, we are days away from delivering a verdict, which will be difficult. But without a doubt, the experience was well worth the inconveniences and frustrations. So, the next time you get a juror notice, try to view it less of an embarrassment and more of an opportunity to perform a key duty of our democracy. It’s worth it.•

__________

Weidenbener is editor-in-chief of IBJ.


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The non-judicial foreclosure lawyer is not … https://ctxetg.com/the-non-judicial-foreclosure-lawyer-is-not/ https://ctxetg.com/the-non-judicial-foreclosure-lawyer-is-not/#respond Fri, 01 Oct 2021 20:17:40 +0000 https://ctxetg.com/the-non-judicial-foreclosure-lawyer-is-not/ Each week, ACA International’s compliance team covers case summaries relevant to ACA members. Members can also submit cases for review to our compliance team at dailydecision@acainternational.org. Here are the cases covered from September 28 to October 1: September 28 Bryan v. Everest Acceptable: the voice message on a mobile phone shared by the consumer is […]]]>

Each week, ACA International’s compliance team covers case summaries relevant to ACA members. Members can also submit cases for review to our compliance team at dailydecision@acainternational.org.

Here are the cases covered from September 28 to October 1:

September 28

Bryan v. Everest Acceptable: the voice message on a mobile phone shared by the consumer is not a communication with a third party

A voicemail message left on a cell phone was not a prohibited third party communication under the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act because there is an expectation of confidentiality on a personal cell phone, unlike a landline answering machine. In addition, it is the consumer who voluntarily disseminates the information by sharing the message.

Continue reading the summary here.

Raymond v. Arcadia Recovery: collector obtains rejection of FDCPA claims

A court has determined that a consumer represented by a lawyer is not imputed from a creditor to his collector. Because the consumer did not allege that the collector actually knew that the consumer was represented by counsel, the court dismissed the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act claims without prejudice. Editor’s Note: This is an archived decision.

Continue reading the summary here.

Myers v. AES: Court dismisses data provider’s request for reconsideration of deliberate and unreasonable consumer dispute investigation

The consumer has challenged the data provider’s business line three times. Despite this, the information has not been fully corrected. The court previously ruled that the data provider unreasonably investigated the consumer disputes and intentionally provided incorrect information. The data provider filed a request for reconsideration.

Continue reading the summary here.

September 29

Marshall v. Grubhub: the claimant has standing for TCPA claims

The court followed the majority view and the recent ruling of the 6th Lindenbaum Circuit, concluding that the severability of the change from extending government debt to the Consumer Protection Act by telephone works both retrospectively and prospectively, so that the validity of the blanket robotic calling ban survived the unconstitutional amendment and thus the plaintiff in this case had standing for its claims.

Continue reading the summary here.

Chisom c. Afni: the letter informing the consumer of the potential consequences of a defect did not obscure the validation period

The consumer received a collection letter for a debt she did not believe she owed. The consumer claimed that she would have challenged it, but the letter troubled her so she did not. The consumer went on to say that the letter overshadowed the validation period. The debt collector requested dismissal and the court granted the debt collector’s request.

Continue reading the summary here.

Bordeaux c. LTD Financial Services: Disclosure of 1099-C Reports Did Not Violate FDCPA

A New Jersey district court found that a letter offering to settle a debt did not violate the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act by including a disclosure regarding the possibility of a 1099-C report.

Continue reading the summary here.

September 30

Rodriguez-Ocasio v. Midland: Arbitration clause has not passed to debt buyer and affiliates

Consumers have filed a class action lawsuit claiming that the debt collector’s initial communication did not include all of the required language. The debt collector attempted to demand arbitration based on the consumers’ agreement with the original creditor. Editor’s Note: This is an archived decision.

Continue reading the summary here.

Reno v. National credit: the term “original creditor” in the recovery letter is not misleading

The consumer received a letter that only used the term “original creditor” to describe the creditor. It also contained an offer to settle and a statement that the debt collector was not obligated to renew it. The consumer claimed the letter was misleading. The court closed the case.

Continue reading the summary here.

Bruce v. Ally Financial: Reporting a closed account with a zero balance and a monthly payment amount did not violate the FCRA

An Alabama district court found that a lender did not violate the Fair Credit Reporting Act by stating that an old account was “closed” with a zero balance but still showing a monthly payment of $ 884.

Continue reading the summary here.

October 1st

Hernandez v. Oliphant Fin: the letter designating the current creditor is neither false nor misleading

The consumer received a collection letter and did not recognize the current creditor or debt collector as entities she had previously done business with, and therefore stated that she did not owe them any money. The consumer claimed that this made the letter she received false and liable to prosecution under the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act. Editor’s Note: This is an archived decision.

Continue reading the summary here.

Dare v. Nam: the non-judicial foreclosure lawyer is not a debt collector

The California District Court applied the rule established under the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act that attorneys engaged in non-judicial foreclosure proceedings do not fall within the definition of a debt collector within the meaning of the law.

Continue reading the summary here.

Gilliam v. Porter Mcguire Kaikona & Chow: magistrate recommends denial of law firm’s attorney’s fee request

The trial judge recommended that the law firm’s claim for attorney’s fees under section 1692k (3) of the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act be dismissed because, although the court agreed that the case had been brought in bad faith, the law firm failed to demonstrate that the action had been brought for the purpose of harassment.

Continue reading the summary here.

If you have recently obtained legal advice that may benefit other ACA members, email it to us: dailydecision@acainternational.org.

  • Join the discussion on legal and compliance topics with your fellow member lawyer program community members on The Hub. Just log in to The center and select Member Advocate Program from the Communities menu.
  • The ACA’s day-to-day decision is fed by ACA’s litigation defense and compliance teams.


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Movie Review: ‘The Sopranos’ Prequel Made For TV Fans | Movies https://ctxetg.com/movie-review-the-sopranos-prequel-made-for-tv-fans-movies/ https://ctxetg.com/movie-review-the-sopranos-prequel-made-for-tv-fans-movies/#respond Fri, 01 Oct 2021 05:10:11 +0000 https://ctxetg.com/movie-review-the-sopranos-prequel-made-for-tv-fans-movies/ When “The Sopranos” is brought up these days, it’s usually for the nebulous way it ended: that now famous blackout in a crowded restaurant while Journey’s “Don’t Stop Believin ‘” plays. . Whether Tony Soprano lived or died is still the subject of heated debate. The real death in 2013 of the great James Gandolfini […]]]>

When “The Sopranos” is brought up these days, it’s usually for the nebulous way it ended: that now famous blackout in a crowded restaurant while Journey’s “Don’t Stop Believin ‘” plays. . Whether Tony Soprano lived or died is still the subject of heated debate.

The real death in 2013 of the great James Gandolfini put an end to hopes of putting this debate to bed, but David Chase, the creator and showrunner of “The Sopranos”, oddly kept the show alive with the new prequel film “The Many. Saints of Newark. “

It’s intriguing mainly because the film evokes the greatest character ever created for television but doesn’t put him in the middle. Tony Soprano is a cameo in his own origin film.

Instead, the guy in the center is Tony’s self-styled uncle Dickie Moltisanti, played with real verve by Alessandro Nivola. Mafia boss Moltisanti is the guy young Tony admires. But he’s riddled with the same flaws Tony will soon share: possessiveness, quick to anger, methodical and yet impulsive, business-inclined, and eager to consume copious amounts of pork products.

In a stroke of genius, the older of the two young Tony Sopranos in the film is played by Michael Gandolfini, the late actor’s son who shares his father’s expressive, bearded big and sad eyes. He’s fascinating.

All the old gangs – now rejuvenated with new actors, of course – are there: Uncle June, Livia Soprano, Paulie Walnuts, Silvio Dante, Pussy Bonpensiero, Janice Soprano, Jackie Aprile, Carmela and even Christopher Moltisanti, son of Dickie Moltisanti .

Michael Imperioli is back as a young Moltisanti and he seems to have a bit of weight about his former mentor, Tony Soprano, because of the older man who suffocated him to death in 2007. So he tells invisible from the grave.

This leads to one of the funniest moments in the movie: When a baby Moltisanti is introduced by his mother to the family but gets too close to Tony, the baby bursts into tears. “It’s like I’m scaring him or something,” Tony shrugs.

The danger here is that the new actors have a blueprint for what their characters will look and sound like in the future. For the most part, they avoid the caricature – like Vera Farmiga nailing Tony’s fearsome mother and Corey Stoll brilliantly capturing the small and irritable Junior. But John Magaro makes fun of Silvio, Stevie Van Zandt’s consigliere a little too much.

One issue here is time, something the film obviously plays with. “The Many Saints of Newark” comes 14 years after the end of “The Sopranos” and it may be too long for anyone but the most ardent fan to keep up. The brain strives to connect new faces with old ones.

The plot is really only a few slices of years ago in and around Newark, New Jersey, in the late 1960s and early 1970s. The DiMeo crime family – of which the Sopranos are a crew – tries to stay afloat during the civil unrest that includes the deadly riots of 1967. But the film sags in many parts, never reaching the series’ focused tension and often seems aimless. If you are not already a fan, this might sound like “Goodfellas” lite.

A formidable Leslie Odom Jr. plays Harold McBrayer, a low-level debt collector who will soon attempt to lead his own team. Ray Liotta wonderfully plays not one but two characters – Dickie’s dead-eyed father and also Dickie’s philosophical and imprisoned uncle. If you are a fan of “The Sopranos”, you will know that Dickie Moltisanti does not appear in the HBO series. You will learn why.

But what about Tony Soprano? How does he become the anxious gangster and father, caught up in the old and the new, as likely to gut an informant brutally as he is to collapse and cry when he hears “Oh Girl” by The Chi-Lite on his car stereo?

We leave it to the dawn of virility, always oscillating between criminality and innocence. Yes, he helps hijack a Mr. Softee truck, but gives all the ice cream. Yes, he takes a pair of stolen speakers, but regrets it. “I’m trying to be good,” he said to his uncle.

There is a revelation of what will become her trigger temper, but also a willingness to embrace mental health aide, which will one day lead to a psychiatrist’s couch. He’s about 20 at the end of the movie, too early to see what really made him.

Credit “The Many Saints of Newark” – screenplay by Chase and Lawrence Konner, and directed by series regular Alan Taylor – for trying to tackle generational violence, structural racism and opening up a story to add more than Italo-Americans shooting each other by branching off into gabagool plates.

But that’s not enough. Tony is as mysterious at the end of “The Many Saints of Newark” as he is at the sudden end of “The Sopranos”. Maybe it is as it should be. Maybe there is room for another prequel.


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Saint-Dominique cancer patient sued by collection agency: donor pays debt https://ctxetg.com/saint-dominique-cancer-patient-sued-by-collection-agency-donor-pays-debt/ https://ctxetg.com/saint-dominique-cancer-patient-sued-by-collection-agency-donor-pays-debt/#respond Thu, 30 Sep 2021 11:01:39 +0000 https://ctxetg.com/saint-dominique-cancer-patient-sued-by-collection-agency-donor-pays-debt/ A Mississippi woman repaid her medical debt following a project released by the Mississippi Center for Investigative Reporting and Featured in the Clarion ledger. Linda Burks owed over $ 4,000 for her breast cancer treatment to Saint DominicJackson, a faith-based nonprofit hospital that hired a debt collector to sue her. Burks is a full-time receptionist […]]]>

A Mississippi woman repaid her medical debt following a project released by the Mississippi Center for Investigative Reporting and Featured in the Clarion ledger.

Linda Burks owed over $ 4,000 for her breast cancer treatment to Saint DominicJackson, a faith-based nonprofit hospital that hired a debt collector to sue her. Burks is a full-time receptionist with health insurance who has started working extra shifts to pay her bills.

St. Dominic Hospital has not changed its policies in response to the report.

Linda Burks of Jackson, who underwent breast cancer surgery and radiation therapy in 2016, made a payment agreement with St. Dominic's Hospital in Jackson to pay the 20% of her bill that her insurance did not cover, but ended up being sued for debt.  collector in any case.

However, a woman who read the series was moved to the action. Recently, she hooked up with Burks and paid off her medical debt.

“We’re supposed to help each other, aren’t we? Wrote the reader, who wished to remain anonymous. “People helped me when I needed it.”

Painful health care prices:St. Dominic knew that patients could not afford care. He continued anyway.


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